4 Things Baseball and Medicine Have in Common

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4 Things Baseball and Medicine Have in Common


During the last academic year, I had the pleasure of serving as chief resident for the LSU Internal Medicine Residency Program. I’m preparing to begin my fellowship training in Pulmonary and Critical Care at the University of Virginia. Once my training is complete, I plan to return back to Baton Rouge. I was born and raised here and am proud to call this place home. After graduating from Broadmoor High School, I was fortunate enough to be able to play baseball for the LSU Tigers. Those years taught me many lessons that I have carried with me to this day. People often ask me if playing for Coach Skip Bertman prepared me for the intensity of residency training. Perhaps in some ways it did.

I know that in baseball and in the practice of medicine you have to rely on your team.

It takes a whole team of medical and surgical specialists to deliver top notch health care. At Our Lady of the Lake we are very fortunate to have highly respected specialists in many fields. These doctors (both academic and private physicians) have shown great commitment to resident education. As resident physicians we work with nurses, nursing assistants, respiratory therapists and many more professionals – all a part of the same team – to provide the very best care for our patients. We trust each other and rely on each other to ensure the very best results for those who entrust us with their care.

Even doctors like a home field advantage.

Before I began my training, I heard that most doctors remain close to where they trained. I’ve learned that the statistic is true. More than 70% of the doctors who trained in internal medicine here in Baton Rouge have remained or returned to Baton Rouge for their practices. I’m looking forward to being in that number when I complete my fellowship training. As we train and continue to recruit more residents, we are building a workforce of talented physicians for the future.

Baseball and academic medicine are economic drivers for the community.

Fans travel for baseball and I’ve learned they also travel for healthcare. Being a major academic medical center attracts top specialists from around the country and provides patients access to the latest technology, research, clinical trials and procedures. Patients want and deserve the very best and they will travel for it.

Patients just like fans, number in the thousands – a lot of people are counting on you.

Each year 260 individual residents and 300 medical students train at Our Lady of the Lake. Residency programs include pediatrics, anesthesia, dentistry, dermatology, emergency medicine, general surgery, internal medicine, neurotology, ophthalmology, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthopedic surgery, otorhinolaryngology, plastic surgery, psychiatry, and vascular surgery. We provide care for nearly 20,000 patients each month in the clinics and surgery center. We provide care to over 4,000 patients each month in the urgent care clinics and we fill over 6,000 prescriptions each month in the LSU Health Baton Rouge Pharmacy. In the hospital we respond to about 100 trauma each month and over the full year in the hospital we care for over 200,000 patients.

Baton Rouge is blessed with strong healthcare organizations and physicians who improve the quality of life for those living in our community every day.

A new class of residents begins this summer. Best of luck in your training and best of luck to the LSU Tigers in the SEC Tournament and post-season play.

About Dr. Ryan Richard

Ryan Richard, MD is the chief resident for the LSU Internal Medicine Residency Program.

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